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Art Basel Garb: The Biological Clock Outfit
by Jauretsi
During Art Basel 2012, one particular artist has converted her own body as the canvas. The ticking clock belt (seen above) is not a bomb. Instead, Mira is sharing her biological clock with the world, making the seemingly “pink elephant” in the room not so, um, big and pink. Her conceptual art project, The Wonder Clock, poses all the big questions of a modern woman. The manifesto reads:
"Hi. My name is Mira and I am ticking. I am also loving, creating, traveling, thinking, laughing, nurturing, evolving, and making money. But the ticking is getting louder. Why do I feel that somehow, at my core, I am failing? Lurching toward that time - unless I turn to the wonders of science - when I will be unable to bear my own children? I created this clock to face my own fears. To beckon the elephant in the room so to speak. To release my own power, my own choices. To open a dialogue with other women about fertility, em- powerment, and loving ourselves. We are women, and we are ticking. But we are so much more."
Perhaps it sounds kinda morbid and negative, but Mira sees it more as a fun invitation for honest dialogue. ”A lot of people feel alone when they get to this topic” she admits to the Atlantic Wire. “I would love for this to do the opposite, where you feel like you’re part of a bigger movement of people, dealing with the same issues, being empowered with information.” If you care to do your own math, Mira made an app, WonderClock on iTunes, based on asking doctors lots of questions. To read more about this social experiment, visit TheWonderClock.com.
(Photo: Jauretsi)

Art Basel Garb: The Biological Clock Outfit

by Jauretsi

During Art Basel 2012, one particular artist has converted her own body as the canvas. The ticking clock belt (seen above) is not a bomb. Instead, Mira is sharing her biological clock with the world, making the seemingly “pink elephant” in the room not so, um, big and pink. Her conceptual art project, The Wonder Clock, poses all the big questions of a modern woman. The manifesto reads:

"Hi. My name is Mira and I am ticking. I am also loving, creating, traveling, thinking, laughing, nurturing, evolving, and making money. But the ticking is getting louder. Why do I feel that somehow, at my core, I am failing? Lurching toward that time - unless I turn to the wonders of science - when I will be unable to bear my own children? I created this clock to face my own fears. To beckon the elephant in the room so to speak. To release my own power, my own choices. To open a dialogue with other women about fertility, em- powerment, and loving ourselves. We are women, and we are ticking. But we are so much more."

Perhaps it sounds kinda morbid and negative, but Mira sees it more as a fun invitation for honest dialogue. ”A lot of people feel alone when they get to this topic” she admits to the Atlantic Wire. “I would love for this to do the opposite, where you feel like you’re part of a bigger movement of people, dealing with the same issues, being empowered with information.” If you care to do your own math, Mira made an app, WonderClock on iTunes, based on asking doctors lots of questions. To read more about this social experiment, visit TheWonderClock.com.

(Photo: Jauretsi)