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8
Meet Blue Carreon 
By Jauretsi
Blue Carreon spans a lot of territory. Shuttling between New York and Hong Kong, Blue is a documenter of style and fashion, observing the business side just as much as he explores the aesthetic one. Forbes and Huffington Post are two of his main hubs to share his insights, in addition to his personal blog, StyleIntel.com. In our quest for fashion intelligence reports, The Inside Source asked him a few questions about shopping, inspiration, and the Far East. 
Jauretsi: You’re a writer for everyone from the Huffington Post to Forbes. What is the beat you like to cover most and why?
Blue: I’ve been a lifestyle journalist for over ten years. I started as a fashion editor for the Tatler in Asia and then as editor-in-chief of the Singapore edition of Amica. Now as a freelance writer, my interests remain the same — fashion, trends, the business of fashion, design and travel. I am the type of person who is intrigued by excellent design, whether it be a haute couture dress, a pair of custom-made men’s shoes, a hotel or a chair.
[MORE]
Q: Name at least five staples every man should have for his closet.
A: I always say that the navy blazer (1) is to men what a little black dress is to women. So that’s on top of my list because you can wear it with almost anything and it can take you to almost any dress code. I build my day-to-day look around a navy blazer, which I most often wear with a crisp white shirt (2), solid blue jeans (3) and brown leather loafers (4). When it gets a little chilly, I throw on a cashmere v-neck sweater (5) over the white shirt and under the blazer. These five items are my own musts and I believe they are the foundations of a solid, wearable wardrobe. From there, you can substitute a vintage tee for the white button down or slim-fit khakis for the jeans.
Q: Which menswear designers are you looking up to now?
A: I am obsessed with anything and everything from Michael Bastian and Ovadia & Sons. In my book, these two can do no wrong. I love how they interpret the hallmarks of men’s dressing to modern times. Whenever I attend Michael Bastian’s shows, I just put my pen down and admire the clothes because I don’t want to miss anything. It’s always modern but timelessly elegant. The same is true for Ovadia & Sons. I also love what Christopher Bailey is doing at Burberry Prorsum. I just wish it didn’t come with such steep prices.
Q: As you pack for the holiday season, what is the one thing you never leave home without?
A: I travel frequently between Hong Kong and New York and I never go on a long-haul trip without an oversized Hermes cashmere scarf. It doubles as a blanket on the plane.
Q: Do you have a personal relationship with eBay? If so, care to share any tips or tricks on using the site?
A: I am a big fan of eBay. I have found a lot of things on eBay, including Alexander Liberman signed lithographs (the two artworks in my photo) and out-of-print art and design books. I have also listed some of my own belongings on eBay, like clothing and even furniture. I go to eBay with specific things in my mind. I try to be very detailed in my searches to make it efficient. I am not usually very good with the bidding process so I always look for the “Buy It Now” option and, if that isn’t available, I email the seller to see if they’ll accept an offer right away.
Q: Are there any overarching trends you find with men in Hong Kong that haven’t reached NY yet?
A: Street style blogs and the Internet have made fashion universal. So you have some guys in Hong Kong dressing like the men you see in Tommy Ton’s posts on Pitti Uomo in double-breasted suits or sorbet-colored trousers. On the other spectrum are those guys inspired by the edgy, envelope-pushing style of Tokyo and Seoul. And then you have those who are decked out in the latest designer collections. Hong Kong is full of men who are fashion die-hards. Whenever I meet designers from New York or Paris in Hong Kong, they often tell me that being in Hong Kong is like being in a fashion magazine. You see so many styles at one time. That said, Hong Kong men are not afraid to experiment with their styles, whether it is buttoned-up Tom Ford one day or conceptual and directional in a Gareth Pugh style the next. Some days, it’s a mix of both.
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You can read more of Blue’s Style Intel at his own blog StyleIntel.com. You can also read more writing at Forbes/BlueCarreon and HuffingtonPost/BlueCarreon. Follow Twitter at @bluecarreon. (Photo: Courtesy of Bruce Bromberg)

Meet Blue Carreon 

By Jauretsi

Blue Carreon spans a lot of territory. Shuttling between New York and Hong Kong, Blue is a documenter of style and fashion, observing the business side just as much as he explores the aesthetic one. Forbes and Huffington Post are two of his main hubs to share his insights, in addition to his personal blog, StyleIntel.com. In our quest for fashion intelligence reports, The Inside Source asked him a few questions about shopping, inspiration, and the Far East. 

Jauretsi: You’re a writer for everyone from the Huffington Post to Forbes. What is the beat you like to cover most and why?

Blue: I’ve been a lifestyle journalist for over ten years. I started as a fashion editor for the Tatler in Asia and then as editor-in-chief of the Singapore edition of Amica. Now as a freelance writer, my interests remain the same — fashion, trends, the business of fashion, design and travel. I am the type of person who is intrigued by excellent design, whether it be a haute couture dress, a pair of custom-made men’s shoes, a hotel or a chair.

[MORE]

Q: Name at least five staples every man should have for his closet.

A: I always say that the navy blazer (1) is to men what a little black dress is to women. So that’s on top of my list because you can wear it with almost anything and it can take you to almost any dress code. I build my day-to-day look around a navy blazer, which I most often wear with a crisp white shirt (2), solid blue jeans (3) and brown leather loafers (4). When it gets a little chilly, I throw on a cashmere v-neck sweater (5) over the white shirt and under the blazer. These five items are my own musts and I believe they are the foundations of a solid, wearable wardrobe. From there, you can substitute a vintage tee for the white button down or slim-fit khakis for the jeans.

Q: Which menswear designers are you looking up to now?

A: I am obsessed with anything and everything from Michael Bastian and Ovadia & Sons. In my book, these two can do no wrong. I love how they interpret the hallmarks of men’s dressing to modern times. Whenever I attend Michael Bastian’s shows, I just put my pen down and admire the clothes because I don’t want to miss anything. It’s always modern but timelessly elegant. The same is true for Ovadia & Sons. I also love what Christopher Bailey is doing at Burberry Prorsum. I just wish it didn’t come with such steep prices.

Q: As you pack for the holiday season, what is the one thing you never leave home without?

A: I travel frequently between Hong Kong and New York and I never go on a long-haul trip without an oversized Hermes cashmere scarf. It doubles as a blanket on the plane.

Q: Do you have a personal relationship with eBay? If so, care to share any tips or tricks on using the site?

A: I am a big fan of eBay. I have found a lot of things on eBay, including Alexander Liberman signed lithographs (the two artworks in my photo) and out-of-print art and design books. I have also listed some of my own belongings on eBay, like clothing and even furniture. I go to eBay with specific things in my mind. I try to be very detailed in my searches to make it efficient. I am not usually very good with the bidding process so I always look for the “Buy It Now” option and, if that isn’t available, I email the seller to see if they’ll accept an offer right away.

Q: Are there any overarching trends you find with men in Hong Kong that haven’t reached NY yet?

A: Street style blogs and the Internet have made fashion universal. So you have some guys in Hong Kong dressing like the men you see in Tommy Ton’s posts on Pitti Uomo in double-breasted suits or sorbet-colored trousers. On the other spectrum are those guys inspired by the edgy, envelope-pushing style of Tokyo and Seoul. And then you have those who are decked out in the latest designer collections. Hong Kong is full of men who are fashion die-hards. Whenever I meet designers from New York or Paris in Hong Kong, they often tell me that being in Hong Kong is like being in a fashion magazine. You see so many styles at one time. That said, Hong Kong men are not afraid to experiment with their styles, whether it is buttoned-up Tom Ford one day or conceptual and directional in a Gareth Pugh style the next. Some days, it’s a mix of both.

———————————————————-

You can read more of Blue’s Style Intel at his own blog StyleIntel.com. You can also read more writing at Forbes/BlueCarreon and HuffingtonPost/BlueCarreon. Follow Twitter at @bluecarreon. (Photo: Courtesy of Bruce Bromberg)